Tag: Diane Guerrero

Doom Patrol: Jane Patrol

Doom Patrol: Jane Patrol

 

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Kay Challis is one of the known members in team and DC Universe series “Doom Patrol” . But within her she is made up 64 personalities, one of the dominate personalities is Jane. In the most recent episode, “Jane Patrol”, Jane kinda went through a burnout out where she just basically shut down from a situation from the previous episode and retreated to the Underground.

The Underground

Source: Forces of Geek

Real quickly, The Underground is where Jane and her 64 personalities reside, each with their own living quarters. This was where she went to retreat from all the…mess…that was happening in the “surface”. The personalities were dealing with one of the most (as all the personalities) annoying characters, “Karen” for nearly getting Jane/Kay married.

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The personalities catch her sneaking off (in hopes of avoiding them), but they catch her. One of the personalities, The Secretary, reminded her that since she is the primary personality, she is responsible for keeping the balance in The Underground. A balance that must be maintained. The Secretary also reminded her this:

The more things remain out of balance, the  more all of us are vulnerable. Each of us has a purpose. A reason for being. You must respect that.

Myself, (although I don’t put myself in a near comatose state), I can retreat in myself, if I don’t want deal with all the crap in the world. It’s safer in my head and I can be in there until I either found a solution or I’m ready to “come out”. Though usually I’m either day dreaming or staring into the TV or space, when I do that. And also unlike Jane who lives with a dissociative identity disorder (DID). You gotta deal with people and bills and responsibilities on top of living in a crazy world. I have deal with keeping my anxiety and depression in check. I try to make sure that not one disorder is overtaking one another or in this case…me. And in a sense depression and anxiety are their own personalities.  I got one disorder telling me everything is hopeless and then the other one telling me everyone is a suspect. It’s well…hopeless.

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 Jane ends up stalling her trip to the “surface” to find and face her past. We eventually see her at meet Penny Farthing at this beautiful lakeside view by a white octagon belle roof gazebo.

Jane doesn’t recognize the place unfortunately. Penny asks her why she isn’t on the surface. Jane responds:

It sucks to be up there. You don’t know who to believe or what to believe or when to believe it.

Speaking for myself, I too want to hide myself from this world. There’s too much to process and then when you meet people it can get even more complicated. Situations can sometimes makes no sense and/or become more complicated themselves. Penny Farthing then tells her to then take a break. As so simple as it is, this is an activity than can be easy to forget or disregard. It’s easy to think because inactivity is not productive, because it doesn’t produce concrete, tangible things. For example, taking a 20 minute nap gives your brain the ability to restore depleted activity. So yes, resting is productive too.

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 Meantime, Cliff has entered Jane’s mind to get her back, but only this time he has return to his former human self. He bumps into Penny Farthing who is trying to stop her from entering a well that might only lead to her destruction.

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 So Penny leads him through a shortcut through some of Jane’s painful memories:

The quickest way to the underground is through memories like this one. The deeper you go, the darker they get. Sometimes, the darker memories are stuck to the nicer ones. You never know. The mind is a crazy thing.

This was a deep statement. It makes me think if the writer was a psychology major at one time. Yeah, I guess with the good memories come the bad. Without the bad you couldn’t appreciate the good. Without the bad, you couldn’t develop personal growth. Heck…you wouldn’t be you as much as I hate to admit it. I don’t always like the past I came from, but it has made me a resilient, open minded, and insightful person.

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 The last scenes of the episode were important because Cliff and Jane had to shed the perceptions of themselves. Cliff still see himself as a man—the shameless, self-centered man that he was, but he is now more man than when he was a man. Then Jane has always seen herself as young defenseless, Baby Kay. When really she has developed into a strong bada$$ woman.

Jane meeting a memory of her younger self before her dad assaulted her

Sometimes what can cause us to lose (or bring) balance can begin within ourselves. Though to achieve this, we must face our past or our hardships, our responsibilities or our false perceptions of ourselves and give ourselves the chance to see what we’re truly capable of and how far we’ve come. Once we’ve done these things, we’ll come back stronger and clearer than ever before.

 

Read Also:

Doom Patrol: Therapy Patrol

Crazy Jane

Doom Patrol: Therapy Patrol

Doom Patrol: Therapy Patrol

Intro

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Source: DC Comics

Okay so not long ago, because it was Batman’s 80th birthday the end of last month, I was able to sign up for 1  months worth of DC Universe for 80 cents. And it was well spent. I LOVE this series. Doom Patrol is based on a group of misfit heroes in the original comic book DC series. Together Robotman (aka Cliff Steele), Cyborg, Elasti-Girl, Negative Man (aka: Larry Trainor) and Jane try save the world and their mentor, The Chief, from Mr. Nobody.

What Is Group Therapy? What Are It’s Benefits?

Source: Showsnob

In the episode, Therapy Patrol, after going back time seeing how the first Doom Patrol was defeated by Mr. Nobody, the quinquennial group fell into a slump. They knew they needed to overcome their fears and weaknesses in order to defeat Mr. Nobody. So, Cliff had an idea: group therapy.

Group therapy is one of many forms of therapy that can be used to develop better thoughts and behaviors, create goals, and have better handle of symptoms, stresses, past experiences. Group therapy can help in many ways! These include (but not limited to):

  • Knowing you’re not alone
  • Encourages giving and receiving support
  • Helps you find your voice
  • Helps you relate to others and yourself in healthier ways
  • Provides a safety net
  • Provides a sounding board
  • Helping you move forward
  • Provide motivation and leadership
  • Developing healthy relationships

In the following paragraphs, I will some of the following examples from above to show how they are used in the show.

Rita

Cliff (although not a therapist) tells Rita to go first. At first she hesitates and says  it’s because of something she did shameful years ago. Also she was ashamed how blobby on of legs were. She is not yet in tune with her powers, so she uses a blanket (or any other means) to hide her leg. Cliff then tells her she needs to talk about it, because doing so will rob the shame of its power. While she still didn’t reveal to the group what she did (she suffocated a movie executive with her elastic powers who was sexually assaulted), but she did reveal this:

Rita: Rita wasn’t a person at all. Rita was an illusion made of light and celluloid and the best hair and wardrobe in the business. If there is no Rita Fair, then there’s nothing else there. I don’t know what I am, I don’t even know who I am.

The moment she revealed her truth, her leg–as Cliff said–turned into legs again.

The scene displayed here was depiction of providing motivation and leadership (which was Cliff) and encouraging and receiving support (which Rita got from Cliff) (Bockisch, n.d.) . When members of a group and receive support, it allows them to look to each other for support, feedback and connection. The therapist is more of the facilitator. In addition, when members provide motivation and leadership, members surrounded by one another, motivate and cheer each other on (Bockisch, n.d.). This is also a place to develop a strong support system and have members cheer you as you progress in your recovery.

In my experience of group therapy (particularly in Celebrate Recovery), I gotta say, I definitely found it encouraging to know the people in my group were cheering me on. I often feel that I have no one to cheer for me, so when I see my Celebrate Recovery friends or call them, it feels good knowing they have my back and won’t judge me. We cheer each other no matter what problems we may face, whether it’s something like drug addiction or sexual assault or family problems. Nobody is trying to chastise each other or tell each other “There’s someone out there who has it worse than you.” They accept you and your problem.

Source: Culturess

Negative Man/ Larry Trainor

Next was Larry’s turn. But before Larry could even go on, Cliff rudely interrupted Larry assuming he was going to say he was gay, that however was not what he wanted to say

Larry: It gets lonely not touching anyone for 60 years. The last person I ever touch was John Bowers. I–loved him. And I drove him away.

Cliff: I knew it. I just wanted you to know that you’re loved and accepted.

Cliff reaches out to hug him.

Larry: I’m not done. I’m only sharing this because it’s the thing Mr. Nobody shoved in my face. What’s left of my face.

Nobody laughs.

Larry: That was a joke. These bandages are the death of all nuance.  Look, if Mr. Nobody’s goal is to torture me, well, I’ve been doing his work for him. Whipping myself in a prison of my own making. What if I’d trusted John? What if I’d been more brave? And guess what? I’m sick of it. I’m not just hurting myself, I’m hurting this thing inside me, and it’s hurting me back endlessly, until there’s so much self-loathing, I can hardly breathe.

The scene depicts two other benefits of group therapy: finding your voice and providing a sound board (Tartakovsky, 2018). How group therapy helps its members find their voice is by helping them develop their awareness of their needs and feelings (Tartakovsky, 2018). In the scene depicted, Larry revealed he craves intimacy and realizing he’s been his own worst enemy the past 60 years. In providing a sound board, members get different perspectives from one another as a support. This is also a chance for members to develop their own innate wisdom. Larry definitely learned that it doesn’t make sense to punish himself, while Mr. Nobody is trying to punish him. He can’t fight two battle and expect himself to win.

The more I find myself talking in group therapy sessions, I realize I know a lot more about myself and circumstances than I care to realize. That I already know, but I needed a safe place and people I could trust with these revelations. Once I reveal them, I feel at peace and more able to take on my inner battles.

Cyborg/Vic Stone

Source: Batman-News

Cyborg: I killed my mom. My dad and I don’t talk about this. I was having an argument with my mom at school. It seemed like everything at the time, but it’s so small now. Anyway, I got pissed and lashed out about some B.S. the thing is my guilt, it used to be the well of my strength. It took me so long to accept what happened and who I became. But, man, I thought Cyborg was a way to make it all right again. Something’s changed. Mr. Nobody, he put this bug in my ear: If my brain and operating system are seamless, then how do I know if my memories are real? The thing I can’t shake is, what the hell could be worse than me killing my own mother? And there is this tiny voice in my head that believes Mr. Nobody when he says that my memories aren’t real. Is that the human part or is that my logic board running game on my brain? As far as I can remember, I’ve never really trusted my father. So that’s not new, but suddenly I’m starting to question why doesn’t he trust me?

Again this also shows how group therapy is a safe place. Unfortunately, the only one he’s ever trusted, his mom, has passed away and he finds his dad an untrustworthy figure in his life. Sometimes, therapy can give us the support we can’t get at home. I know for me, I don’t feel like I get the support and understanding, so going to group therapy is helpful. I get to dispel my doubts, my fears, and my sorrows in front of people who in turn support me and accept me without judgement.

Jane

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Next, was Jane’s turn, but she tried to deflect by showing a grotesque picture that she painted that (when she was captured by Mr. Nobody) depicted the team’s fate.

Cliff: Group isn’t over until you share.

Jane: Who are you all of a sudden?

Cliff: You don’t get to throw a grenade into our therapy session and pretend that’s happening

Jane: This isn’t therapy!

Cliff: May be it’s okay if it’s just talking. Out of all people, you need someone to talk to. Not sharing is a form of self-isolation. Your mind a beautiful strange place full of mystery. Come one just say it! It’s a safe place.

Jane: You’ll never be a father because you aren’t even a man.

Cliff: I’m the only one who can stand you and I only like one 64th of you.

Other forms of therapy (as depicted in this scene) is it helps you relate to others and yourself in healthier ways and provides a safety net (Tartakovsky, 2018). Group therapy provides a safety net by allowing people to be themselves, learn to take risk and reduce isolation. How group therapy helps you relate with others and yourself in healthier ways is by having a safe place for members to get feed back from each other (Tartakovsky, 2018). Cliff took a risk by having Jane (as defensive as she was) realize that he and members of their group have her back. And I have to agree with Cliff. She does need the social interaction, especially after being in a psych ward for so long and interacting with the other 64 personalities. To be honest, I wouldn’t be surprised if she has social anxiety after seeing her response (or lack thereof) with the team. And by being with them, she will get to practice socializing. For me, that’s what group therapy did for me. It wasn’t what I was there for initially, but it helped. I’m not as timid as I have been in the past and by taking the time to call others or for others call me, made me not feel so alone. Not to mention, I realized people would accept me for who I was without judging me.  I was practicing how to relate with people without knowing it. I think if Jane had team, especially Cliff accept her…condition… not only will she learn how to relate to the team, but I think she’d learn to love herself too. Speaking of which…

The Final Reason Why Group Therapy is Beneficial

Source: DC Comics News

Lastly group therapy is beneficial because it helps you realize you’re not alone (Tartakovsky, 2018) and you get a chance to develop healthy friendships (Bockisch, n.d.). Sometimes when we look at one another it may appear that we’re alone, because we look differently, have different lifestyles…heck even different struggles, but we are not only in our struggles (Tartakovsky, 2018). Rita, Cliff (daddy-daughter issues), Vic, Larry, and Jane all come from different walks of life, but each of them revealed they insecurities, shame, fear, and other forms of struggle that they were all dealing with. So it helps to bring the walls down a bit. Also, it helps to develop friendships, because it’s the perfect place to meet like minded individuals who may have faced similar circumstances and understand what it’s like to fall in their journey to recover. While the Doom Patrol team is taking a while to be a team (much less friends) I wouldn’t be surprised that they will build a bond strong enough to defeat Mr. Nobody. Besides that’s how friendships–even romantic ones— form…by being vulnerable. It’s like the quote below says:

We all need somebody to talk to. It would be good if we talked…not just pitter-patter, but real talk. We shouldn’t be so afraid, because most people really like this contact; that you show you are vulnerable makes them free to be vulnerable. —Liv Ullmann

Conclusion

I remember in a previous post I wrote titled, “Crazy Jane” I was wondering if Doom Patrol was going to put a dent in the mental health community and in mental health awareness, but after watching these last 10 episodes, I am very confident it will do justice in everything mental health. I like its weirdness, the blossoming comradery, but most of all I’ve enjoy its reverence toward mental health awareness. I hope it will continue to do so in future seasons (I’m banking that there will be ).

Find “Doom Patrol” on DC Universe.

Read Also:

Crazy Jane

Doom Patrol: Jane Patrol

References

Bockisch, C. (n.d) 4 Advantages of Group Therapy. Retrieved from:https://www.orlandorecovery.com/blog/4-advantages-group-therapy/#gref

Tartakovsky, M. (2018). 5 Benefits of Group Therapy. Retrieved from: https://psychcentral.com/lib/5-benefits-of-group-therapy/

Crazy Jane

Crazy Jane

If you watched OITNB, you may have noticed that Flaca played by Jackie Cruz and her best friend, Maritza played Diane Guerrero were not together in its latest season. Gasp! Although we see how Flaca made a new friend in Black Cindy and the budding friendship seemed to have worked well for season 6. Speaking of which I don’t know why she’s called “Black Cindy”. Since like the past 6 seasons, I’ve never seen another Cindy. Oh well…

I’m gonna miss these two!

The reason for Ms. Guerrero’s absence as you may have probably heard already is she’s cast to play “Crazy Jane” in the newly DC Universe steaming service tv show (what a mouthful), “Doom Patrol”.

Originally a character from “Vertigo” comics (DC’s sister comic book company), Crazy Jane is the dominant personality of Kay Challis and is one of her 64 personalities who each have a superpower of their own. Huh…that’s like having the personalities/powers of Batman, Aquaman, Cyborg, Superman, even Wonder Woman all wrapped in one person.. How would a person be able to manage that?

Kay’s other 64 personalities

When Kay was 5 years old, she was molested by her own father while putting together a jigsaw puzzle. Unable to deal with the trauma, “Miranda” was born. Unfortunately Miranda is raped at church thus triggering the first incident. After this incident, the Miranda personality ceased to exist while Kay developed a massive personality fragmentation and the other 64 personality were born.

In addition to the Miranda personality, you “meet” the main personality Jane who has no superpowers. Then there is (just to name a few):

•Black Annis (the one in the picture) who is an “aggressive misandris, equipped with sharp claws, red eyes and blue skin

•Sun Daddy, “a gigantic figure with a sun for a head with the power to throw powerballs”

•The Death Eater. “She believes she must suffer for her sins. Janes brings her out as a defense when tortured.”

All these personalities help the members of “Doom Patrol”.

Diane Guerrero herself has been open with seeking mental health treatment, so it would be interesting for her to play this character. In fact, it would be interesting how as a show it would talk about mental illness and sexual assault. “Talking” about such topics is different in a comic book than in a show. However that being DC Universe has its own streaming service, it could be possible. I mean we’ve already seen what streaming services like Netflix and Amazon have done for shows, movies, & documentaries that otherwise may have never reached tv airwaves and the silver screen.

My question is now…will the portrayal of Crazy Jane hurt or help the mental health community? Will it encourage the stigma or end it? Will the character be able to portray those who lives with mental illness and have survived sexual assault? We all know how Hollywood has portrayed mental illness in the past and as for sexual assault, I hope there isn’t a rape scene. Please God no. It was hard enough once have watched a rape scene in the first season of “13 Reason”, then apparently I heard there are now two rape scenes in the latest season.

The director of “13 Reasons”, Brian Yorkey, did his research on rape cases mentioned he thought the scene was appropriate so people can better depict its graphic nature. So??? Couldn’t he just talk to sexual assault survivors??? What because he did research on sexual assault cases he thinks that it’s okay to show it considering there are young teen watching??? Besides, the show is not the first to discuss rape (see Law and Order: SVU) and therefore if most of the shows and movies have done that in the past, so can “13 Reasons”. Myself included, talking about sexual assault to family and friends was not easy, so what about faux scene on a tv show??? I really hate it when entertainment now days (hell…social media) is done for “shock value”. Is it really worth losing standards over??? By the way, the best places to understand what sexual assault is by looking up anti-sexual assault websites like RAIN or 1 in 6. Rape is a hard thing in itself to understand for and for some show (or network) to just trivialize it is insulting to me.

When I am to afford DC Universe, I will give the show a chance. I mean “Titans” is already facing major backlash (I’ll still watch it)—that and a Black woman is playing Starfire. I really DON’T see the problem in that ESPECIALLY since there are NOT a lot Black heroines in the DC Universe. The only one I can CLEARLY name is Vixen. So people should take a chill pill. Sheesh. The comic book industry is slowly starting (damn shame though) to appeal to a diverse group of viewers and readers. Last year we had the first heroine with a LEAD role and we had this year, a Black Superhero with a LEAD role. Now next year, we have a Latina heroine who lives with mental illness. Hopefully through her character (I like how this story came up on the last day of National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month), it will show that ANY person of color is capable of living with mental illness and that even with it, you can still do great things. So DC please, don’t disappoint me.

“Doom Patrol” is slated to show on DC Universe next year.

References/Resources:

Crazy Jane (Wikipedia)

DC Universe’s Doom Patrol casts OITNB alum as Crazy Jane

Diane Guerrero OITNB Talks Mental Health Book

13 Reasons Why Creator Defends Controversial Rape Scene: “Talking About It Is So Much Better Than Silence”