Tag: OCD

Finding Help for Mental Health

There are various resources to help you or your loved one manage a mental health crisis. Below are various websites that can lead to mental health resources either over the phone or in person.

National (U.S.)

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Offers International Phone Number
275483-9-1265210296301
Offers International Phone Number
  • 6443923_orig

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International Sites

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The Behaivoral Health of the Residents of the Hundred Acre Wood

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I remember in my senior year of high school on my way to AP Government class, a classmate of mine mentioned how the characteristics of Winnie-the-Pooh were based on the symptoms  of mental health disorders. I was shocked that a childhood classic may have been indirectly depicting symptoms of mental illnesses! But I was a little skeptical about this information–Did A.A. Milne really base these well known characters on the symptoms of mental illness? Well…no.

In actuality the story was lightly based on his son, Christopher Robin Milne. Does the name sound familar? If not, well the character Robin was named after his named after.

Winnie-the-Pooh was based off his son’s teddy bear. “Winnie” was named after a brown bear (although the teddy bear’s real name was Growler)  Milne and his son use to visit at the London Zoo. “Pooh” was a name his son use to name a swan. Piglet, Tigger, Eeyore, Kanga were based off the stuffed toys Christopher Milne played with; Rabbit and Owl were made up by Milne and his illustrator, E.H. Shepard.

Hmm…so it seems there’s no mention on how mental illness inspired the characteristics of the well-reknown characters. So how did this speculation come about?

Okay so back in 2000, four Canadian researchers by the names of Shea, Gordon, Hawkins, Kawchuk, and Smith have discovered similar traits of some mental health disorders seem to match the personalities of the Winnie-the-Pooh characters. Here are a few of them:

Eeyore Mental Health

Piglet

Tigger

Pooh Mental Health

When I was putting these slides together, I really saw how similar this their characteristics were to some of the symptoms of behavioral disorders! I have to say it’s pretty remarkable and it’s also remarkable how these four researchers had time to put the information together!

There are also clinical disorders for Rabbit, Owl, and Christopher Robin, but just putting these four slides together! Well, if you want more information on the character’s diagnosis and on the research itself, click on the link below:

Pathology in the Hundred Acre Wood: A Neurodevelopmental  Perspective on A.A.Milne

African Americans and Mental Illness

Discussion on mental illness among the African American community is not discussed a lot. I mean I should know… My family had a hard time accepting my illness and medication. My mom just recently admitted that she was in denial of my mental illness and now is looking forward to attend an education class on mental illness.

But mental health is real among our people. And it needs to be addressed now. I have below a list of articles and a radio conversation not only revealing why African Americans do not seek mental illness, but how some African Americans have learned how to cope with it:

Why African Americans Avoid Pyschotherapy

Black Girls Don’t Get to Be Depressed

Mental Health and You

Do Whites Have a Mental Health Edge?

Black Folks and Mental Health: Why Do We Suffer in Silence?

African Americans with OCD: A Hidden Population and New Research

Guest post-Why Jesus Couldn’t Save Me From Depression

The Secret Life of Depression and Mental Illness In The Black Community